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Sunday, November 8, 2020 | History

3 edition of Biotechnology for small-scale farmers in developing countries found in the catalog.

Biotechnology for small-scale farmers in developing countries

Biotechnology for small-scale farmers in developing countries

analysis and assessment procedures

by

  • 27 Want to read
  • 23 Currently reading

Published by VU University Press in Amsterdam .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Agricultural biotechnology -- Developing countries.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references.

    StatementJoske F.G. Bunders, ed.
    ContributionsBunders, Joske F. G.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination232 p. :
    Number of Pages232
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15313994M
    ISBN 109062569358


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Biotechnology for small-scale farmers in developing countries Download PDF EPUB FB2

Biotechnology is often considered as an instrument to promote rural development in developing countries through an improvement in agricultural production and employment opportunities. This book describes the conditions under which biotechnology can possibly achieve these objectives, especially with reference to small farmers.

A brief introduction to research projects, developed in Zimbabwe. Get this from a library. Biotechnology for small-scale farmers in developing countries: analysis and assessment procedures. [Joske F G Bunders;]. The book introduces the concepts of participatory plant breeding and diversified site-or field potential to meet the needs of small-scale farmers in developing countries whose traditional wisdom and indigenous knowledge can be put to good use through inputs from modern biotechnology for.

The middle section of the book is de voted to different technical aspects of agricultural biotechnology and its implications. The book ends with two country case histories.

Biotechnology for small-scale farmers in developing countries - analysis and assessment procedures edited by Joske F G Bunders pp ISBN 90 8 Pbk VU. The Book Introduces The Concepts Of Participatory Plant Breeding And Diversified Site-Or Field Potential To Meet The Needs Of Small-Scale Farmers In Developing Countries Whose Traditional Wisdom And Indigenous Knowledge Can Be Put To Good Use Through Inputs From Modern Biotechnology For The Benefit Fo Humanity.

As such, it mainly benefited farmers and particularly small-scale farmers in developing countries (Anthony & Ferroni, ; Raney, ). As compared to the positive impacts and the remarkable. The small scale farmers in developing countries are faced with many problems and constraints.

Their crop harvest is prone to pre and postharvest crop losses, due to biotic and abiotic stresses like insects, diseases, weeds, and droughts, which as a consequence lead to fluctuation and uncertainties in their incomes and food availability.

^ Free Book Biotechnology Building On Farmers Knowledge ^ Uploaded By Ann M. Martin, biotechnology building on farmers knowledge uploaded by evan hunter bunders bertus haverkort wim hiemstra the book presents a participatory and interactive methodology for the development of biotechnologies for small scale farmers in the.

The establishment of biotechnology parks and medicinal plant farms in several Biotechnology for small-scale farmers in developing countries book countries is indicative of biotechnology being accorded high policy status in national development; of its significance in the eradication of poverty; and of its use in the empowerment of women in applying the technology for human and social welfare.

Unlike Bt crops, HT crops are mainly grown in developing countries and by large-scale farmers in Latin America, while farmers in developing countries usually rely on manual weeding (James, ).

Apart from estimating the farm level benefits, the distribution of these benefits is also important, in particular to small-scale versus large-scale. Get this from a library. Biotechnology: building on farmers' knowledge. [Joske F G Bunders; Bertus Haverkort; Wim Hiemstra;] -- The book presents a participatory and interactive methodology for the development of biotechnologies for small-scale farmers in the tropics that builds on farmer's knowledge and makes use of the.

biotechnology building on farmers knowledge Aug 30 wim hiemstra the book presents a participatory and interactive methodology for the development of biotechnologies for small scale farmers in the tropics that builds on farmers get this from a library biotechnology building on farmers knowledge joske f g bunders bertus haverkort wim hiemstra.

Biotechnology and Agricultural Development. Transgenic Cotton, Rural Institutions, and Resource-Poor Farmers By Robert Tripp NY: Routledge Reviewed by Ellen Messer Visiting Associate Professor Friedman School of Nutrition Science & Policy Tufts University Lecturer Boston University Gastronomy Program _____ Perhaps no modern agricultural topic raises so much controversy as genetically.

The figure represents the distribution of resource-poor farmers in developing countries. Of million farmers that cultivated GM crops inmillion farmers are from China with an average of hectares for GM cotton, and million farmers from India cultivated mainly GM cotton.

Results show that absence of enabling institutions and lack of farmer knowledge can considerably limit the benefits of Bt cotton for small-scale farmers.

The paper points out the importance to include the institutional conditions in the evaluation of agricultural biotechnology in developing countries.

Genetically modified (GM) crops or biotech crops, have been commercialized in both developing and industrialized countries since Inmillion farmers from 28 countries planted crops.

ISAAA is a not-for-profit international organization that shares the benefits of crop biotechnology to various stakeholders, particularly resource-poor farmers in developing countries, through knowledge sharing initiatives and the transfer and delivery of proprietary biotechnology applications.

She has also participated in many international forums in support of biotechnology for developing countries and Africa. She has authored or co-authored over papers and publications in local and international journals and has written this book, Modifying Africa: How Biotechnology can benefit the Poor and the Hungry ().Reviews: 1.

not whether biotechnology can benefit small-scale resource-poor farmers, but rather how biotechnology can address the agricultural problems faced by farmers in developing countries. Biotechnology is a promising new tool in the development of applied agricultural technologies.

The challenge is to focus this potential on the problems experienced. The growth of agricultural biotechnology, also known as agritech, was such that byseven million farmers were utilizing biotech crops, with more than 85% of these farmers located in developing countries [2].

Traditionally, small-scale farming in developing countries has been stereotyped as backbreaking, not commensurate with the efforts exerted, unprofitable, and particularly unappealing to the youth. But farmers planting biotech crops paint a different picture.

In developing countries like India, producing more food grains to feed the one billion plus people is the key to prosperity. Towards this, several biotechnology companies including Monsanto and Syngenta, have begun implementing GM crop programs. For example, production of Bt cotton in the southern part of India is a reality As far as.

the social upliftment of people in their communities by benefiting both farm and non-farm beneficiaries such as farm workers, household producers, small-scale land owners, food garden producers. Agricultural Biotechnology in Developing Countries: Towards Optimizing the Benefits for the Poor.

Springer US. ISBN CS1 maint: ref=harv ; Karembu, Margaret Gathoni. Small Scale Farmers'Adoptive Responses to Banana Biotechnology in Kenya: Implications for Policy (PDF). Kenya: The African Technology Policy Studies Network. Although within most developing countries holdings will continue to be mostly of small to medium size, farmers would have access to a far greater range of technologies for sustainable resource management and production, and would be continuously adding to these options through active learning, innovation and farmer-to-farmer exchanges.

It provides a review of the application of biotechnology to the processing of food (including beverages) produced from agriculture, specifically focussing on its relevance for developing countries.

The paper begins with a general discussion on the current status of biotechnology in. At present, developing countries are major importers of animal feeds (mainly coarse grains) as well as meat and dairy products. The cost of importing animal feeds into developing countries is estimated at between US$10 billion and $15 billion per year (Figure 4).

Agroecology is already practised by millions of small-scale farmers across the world. China and India, for example, account for 35 percent and 24 percent of the world’s million family farms.

health and social benefits to both large- and small-scale farmers in developing and industrial countries since the first GM crop was commercialised in Both the number of countries adopting the technology and the acreage under GM crops has continued to rise exponentially over the last 20 years.

Biotechnology is already beginning to provide sustainable ­ and life-sustaining ­ assistance to farmers in developing countries. Through the use of biotechnology, researchers are providing higher-yielding strains of staple crops, foods with enhanced nutritional traits, and plants and produce that last longer and are resistant to devastating viruses.

A good example of how biotechnology can reach rural farmers involves a special program by the Biotechnology Development Co-operation of the Netherlands Government, the Kenyan Ministry of Research, Science and Technology, and the small-scale farming system stakeholders.

If the small farmers in developing countries are to survive -- and they must if broad-based development is to take place in developing countries -- we need more equality-generating forms of food production, which can continue to provide small farmers with a viable source of. developing countries, living in a rural area increases a person's probability of suffering from poverty markets in favour of small-scale farmers Oxford, Oxfam International.

11 Grain. The developing world is home to more than million obese adults, nearly 30% more than the million chronically overweight adults in wealthy countries. "Developing countries do not have the resources to conduct research in modern biotechnology and the seed, the technology and other input requirements cannot be afforded by smallholder farmers.

boost food production and quality in developing countries has become a focal point for biotechnology advocates and critics alike.i In some respects, the debate about the appropriateness of GM crops for develop-ing countries is not all that different from the debate occurring in the industri-alized world.

In recognition of the importance of biotechnology to National which accrued to farmers in developing countries. concerns that transgenic crops would not benefit small-scale farmers. That, however, may not always benefit small-scale farmers in developing countries, as the industry, at least initially, focused their products on the needs of farmers in developed countries.

The Socio-Political Impact of Biotechnology in Developing Countries. The socio-political ramifications of biotechnologies in developing countries are extremely complex. Not only do they vary from country to country and from sector to sector of a nation's economy, they are also different for the various segments of its population.

Despite the proclamations of the so-called "organic" movement and the anti-industry activists, small farmers in developing countries are benefiting significantly from genetically modified crops.

Put another way, the Green Revolution helped to raise the nutritional status of up to 42 million preschool children in developing countries (R. E. .